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By Helen Trubridge 15 Sep, 2017

There's often a theme to the class such as  keeping the back healthy, goal setting, stronger core muscles or relaxation. Newcomers and complete beginners are always given a very warm welcome. Below is an example of a typical class.

Activations

The class usually begins with standing warm-ups called Activations. These often focus on warming up the spine and preparing the body for yoga postures. Typical moves might be shaking – fingers, wrists, arms, toes, legs; getting some lovely movement into our body. Spinal twists – twisting the spine from side to side, using the arms to propel you around sending lots of blood and oxygen to those spinal discs, and not forgetting spinal waves; stretching up and then folding into forward bends.

Energy Block Release (EBR) or Sequence

Dru Yoga has some great sequences known as Energy Block Releases (EBR) designed to unblock tension and create a lovely flow of energy around the body.

These vary each class and we’ll also cover sequences inspired by nature; Salutation to the Sun, Earth Sequence and Moon Sequence, and many others.

Asana (postures)

If you have tried other yoga styles, you will recognise asanas such as the Tree, Cat, Dog etc. but they’re always done with a Dru twist and we often flow through the moves rather than hold a posture for a long period. For those with health issues variations and modifications are suggested to help you feel as comfortable as possible. The emphasis is on listening to the body; no good ever came from forcing someone into a yoga posture that hurt or felt completely alien.

Relaxation

Each class always ends with at least 5 minutes (more if possible) of guided relaxation designed to help the mind and body switch off. Giving yourself the space and time to relax is one of the most important things you can do to reverse the negative effects of stress and a busy, demanding lifestyle.  

About the teacher – Helen Trubridge

“I am passionate about giving people the full yoga experience. For me, it’s not just about racing through postures, the full benefits of yoga are only achieved when someone is completely in the moment, and taking the time to notice what is happening in the mind and body. I always include the benefits of each posture and sequence to help you connect and understand the effect it’s having on the body. Who knew that the Cobra also helps keep your organs healthy as well as giving your spine and shoulders a lovely stretch? It’s these little nuggets of information that help keep me hooked on practising and teaching yoga.”

Helen offers classes at Wollaton Park Community Centre, Akasha Yoga Centre in Beeston and Impact Physiotherapy Clinic in Long Eaton. I am also available for 1-2-1 classes.

Contact for more information: 07887734920 or helen@trubridgeyoga.co.uk

By Helen Trubridge 29 Nov, 2016
As I get submerged in becoming self-employed and making sure the relevant boxes are ticked, it would be easy to forget why I chose this path. After all I left a comfortable job with lovely colleagues to go it alone. There are many reasons - work/life balance (I didn't want to be in front of a computer all day), to improve my own health and to help others. I love meeting new people and seeing the benefit and enjoyment they get from a yoga session. 

There is another reason though. As I drifted through my days, teaching yoga on a Saturday and providing the odd cover class; it became clear that I wanted more of this life. Negative thoughts raced through my head - what if no-one comes to my classes, what if people think I'm stupid and laugh at me, what if I completely fail. All these thoughts are enough to put anyone off but the thought that screamed loudest in my head was "what happens to me if I don't do this?" 

There comes a point when it's more of a challenge to continue with the norm than to challenge yourself to make a change.
By Helen Trubridge 29 Nov, 2016

Many people venture to a yoga class not knowing what type of yoga they are heading to. There are lots of different styles and schools but the heart of every yoga class remains the same; giving the participant the time to switch off and the space to be still.

When I walked into Susan's yoga class on a grim January evening I didn't have a clue that it was Dru. She's since told me that the session was a lot more ethereal than she'd usually plan when there was a newcomer but lucky for me I was a last-minute drop-in. I loved the almost meditative, flowing movements of the energy block release sequence she led us through. Six months later I was on the teacher-training course so I guess things are meant to be.

I've heard people comment that Dru is very gentle as though it's a bad thing. Dru comes from the Sanskrit word dhruva, which refers to the stillness that can be experienced in Dru Yoga and Dru Meditation. Stilling the mind and body for even 10 minutes a day is truly the best thing you can do for yourself. 

For some people though it is genuinely a struggle to lie still, which I'll be honest came as a surprise to me when I started teaching - I love lying down doing nothing. However, lying prone for even those 10 minutes goes against our natural instinct to always be active. Let's face it, even when we're sat on the couch, we're not relaxing even though we might think we are - watching TV, online shopping, working on laptops or scrolling through facebook are not the most relaxing activities.

Dru works on body, mind and spirit—improving strength and flexibility, creating core stability, building a heightened feeling of positivity, and deeply relaxing and rejuvenating your whole being.

Here are just a few of the great things about Dru Yoga:

  1. It's accessible for everyone - don't feel like standing? you can sit down to do a posture. Dru Yoga teachers are trained to modify and adapt the class to be inclusive. 
  2. It's great for your back -   In a survey of 450 Dru Yoga students, 72% found Dru Yoga reduced their back pain. Dru is designed to be very safe; balancing your back muscles to bring ease and avoid injury.
  3. You'll find energy that you didn't even realise you had. Dru has developed unique sequences called Energy Block Releases (EBRs), these are a range of movements designed to stretch and tone the whole body, and release energy that is trapped. 
  4. The relaxation - each Dru class ends with a 10-15 minute lie-down. Students are free to close their eyes if they wish and focus on their breathing to calm the body down. 
Helen teaches Dru Yoga on Thursday evenings (18:30 - 19:30 & 19:45-20:45) at Wollaton Park Community Centre and Saturday morning 9:45am-10:45am at Akasha Yoga Centre, Beeston.

By Helen Trubridge 15 Sep, 2017

There's often a theme to the class such as  keeping the back healthy, goal setting, stronger core muscles or relaxation. Newcomers and complete beginners are always given a very warm welcome. Below is an example of a typical class.

Activations

The class usually begins with standing warm-ups called Activations. These often focus on warming up the spine and preparing the body for yoga postures. Typical moves might be shaking – fingers, wrists, arms, toes, legs; getting some lovely movement into our body. Spinal twists – twisting the spine from side to side, using the arms to propel you around sending lots of blood and oxygen to those spinal discs, and not forgetting spinal waves; stretching up and then folding into forward bends.

Energy Block Release (EBR) or Sequence

Dru Yoga has some great sequences known as Energy Block Releases (EBR) designed to unblock tension and create a lovely flow of energy around the body.

These vary each class and we’ll also cover sequences inspired by nature; Salutation to the Sun, Earth Sequence and Moon Sequence, and many others.

Asana (postures)

If you have tried other yoga styles, you will recognise asanas such as the Tree, Cat, Dog etc. but they’re always done with a Dru twist and we often flow through the moves rather than hold a posture for a long period. For those with health issues variations and modifications are suggested to help you feel as comfortable as possible. The emphasis is on listening to the body; no good ever came from forcing someone into a yoga posture that hurt or felt completely alien.

Relaxation

Each class always ends with at least 5 minutes (more if possible) of guided relaxation designed to help the mind and body switch off. Giving yourself the space and time to relax is one of the most important things you can do to reverse the negative effects of stress and a busy, demanding lifestyle.  

About the teacher – Helen Trubridge

“I am passionate about giving people the full yoga experience. For me, it’s not just about racing through postures, the full benefits of yoga are only achieved when someone is completely in the moment, and taking the time to notice what is happening in the mind and body. I always include the benefits of each posture and sequence to help you connect and understand the effect it’s having on the body. Who knew that the Cobra also helps keep your organs healthy as well as giving your spine and shoulders a lovely stretch? It’s these little nuggets of information that help keep me hooked on practising and teaching yoga.”

Helen offers classes at Wollaton Park Community Centre, Akasha Yoga Centre in Beeston and Impact Physiotherapy Clinic in Long Eaton. I am also available for 1-2-1 classes.

Contact for more information: 07887734920 or helen@trubridgeyoga.co.uk

By Helen Trubridge 29 Nov, 2016
As I get submerged in becoming self-employed and making sure the relevant boxes are ticked, it would be easy to forget why I chose this path. After all I left a comfortable job with lovely colleagues to go it alone. There are many reasons - work/life balance (I didn't want to be in front of a computer all day), to improve my own health and to help others. I love meeting new people and seeing the benefit and enjoyment they get from a yoga session. 

There is another reason though. As I drifted through my days, teaching yoga on a Saturday and providing the odd cover class; it became clear that I wanted more of this life. Negative thoughts raced through my head - what if no-one comes to my classes, what if people think I'm stupid and laugh at me, what if I completely fail. All these thoughts are enough to put anyone off but the thought that screamed loudest in my head was "what happens to me if I don't do this?" 

There comes a point when it's more of a challenge to continue with the norm than to challenge yourself to make a change.
By Helen Trubridge 29 Nov, 2016

Many people venture to a yoga class not knowing what type of yoga they are heading to. There are lots of different styles and schools but the heart of every yoga class remains the same; giving the participant the time to switch off and the space to be still.

When I walked into Susan's yoga class on a grim January evening I didn't have a clue that it was Dru. She's since told me that the session was a lot more ethereal than she'd usually plan when there was a newcomer but lucky for me I was a last-minute drop-in. I loved the almost meditative, flowing movements of the energy block release sequence she led us through. Six months later I was on the teacher-training course so I guess things are meant to be.

I've heard people comment that Dru is very gentle as though it's a bad thing. Dru comes from the Sanskrit word dhruva, which refers to the stillness that can be experienced in Dru Yoga and Dru Meditation. Stilling the mind and body for even 10 minutes a day is truly the best thing you can do for yourself. 

For some people though it is genuinely a struggle to lie still, which I'll be honest came as a surprise to me when I started teaching - I love lying down doing nothing. However, lying prone for even those 10 minutes goes against our natural instinct to always be active. Let's face it, even when we're sat on the couch, we're not relaxing even though we might think we are - watching TV, online shopping, working on laptops or scrolling through facebook are not the most relaxing activities.

Dru works on body, mind and spirit—improving strength and flexibility, creating core stability, building a heightened feeling of positivity, and deeply relaxing and rejuvenating your whole being.

Here are just a few of the great things about Dru Yoga:

  1. It's accessible for everyone - don't feel like standing? you can sit down to do a posture. Dru Yoga teachers are trained to modify and adapt the class to be inclusive. 
  2. It's great for your back -   In a survey of 450 Dru Yoga students, 72% found Dru Yoga reduced their back pain. Dru is designed to be very safe; balancing your back muscles to bring ease and avoid injury.
  3. You'll find energy that you didn't even realise you had. Dru has developed unique sequences called Energy Block Releases (EBRs), these are a range of movements designed to stretch and tone the whole body, and release energy that is trapped. 
  4. The relaxation - each Dru class ends with a 10-15 minute lie-down. Students are free to close their eyes if they wish and focus on their breathing to calm the body down. 
Helen teaches Dru Yoga on Thursday evenings (18:30 - 19:30 & 19:45-20:45) at Wollaton Park Community Centre and Saturday morning 9:45am-10:45am at Akasha Yoga Centre, Beeston.

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